June 21st, 2007

How do I use snap-back with C.B.A. Ichi-Roku?

View the answer. Q: Every strike there is to be a snap back immediately after that strike, right? C.B.A. Ichi Roku is what I'm questioning. Should there be a snap back to "home" after each strike, or is it OK to snap into the next strike? If you could give me some direction on this i would deeply appreciate it. A: Dear Sanchinka, As to your question regarding Ichi-Roku snap-back, I will try not to talk in circles: Short answer version: yes, yes, no/yes. My questions to you before you read on: what is a snap back? What is it's purpose? How do you define "home"? Q: Every strike there is to be a snap back immediately after that strike, right? C.B.A. Ichi Roku is what I'm questioning. Should there be a snap back to "home" after each strike, or is it OK to snap into the next strike? If you could give me some direction on this i would deeply appreciate it. A: Dear Sanchinka, As to your question regarding Ichi-Roku snap-back, I will try not to talk in circles: Short answer version: yes, yes, no/yes. My questions to you before you read on: what is a snap back? What is it's purpose? How do you define "home"? First part of your question," every strike we have, there is to be a snap back immediately after that strike, right?": Yes, every strike requires a snap-back. Without a snap-back, a strike would be incomplete. It wou b lke typ g o ly s m of the le t rs in a s tenc : ma ki g l t le sens ! But how do we define snap-back? We define a snap-back for ku ranks in simple terms of getting our fist (or whatever the weapon, be it foot, elbow, knee) back to us. We want to leave energy of the strike (power) with (in) the opponent. Without snap-back, energy is lost (given up without results), power is low, our body is left open and vulnerable, and we are unprepared to continue with a movement or thought, a technique or strategy, to carry on. Think of it in mental application too, i.e. word as weapons. This might help you envision the big picture: think of the snap-back as "closure" of an idea, of completion of a thought (concept or strategy), leaving it with the opponent. Now we're ready to move on, in whatever way we choose. This also keeps us in an active mode, rather than being reactionary. We know we need some way to bring the weapon back to starting point. Much like a stretched rubber band coming back to original position, the weapon direction is reversed and comes back to (what you referred to as) "home." A "home" position would be where you snap to in any strike series, be it basics, CBAs, or in a form. The term "home" conjures ideas of what is "familiar" and "protected," a place we're familiar, a place we start from each day in our daily journeys and a place or something physical to come back to. (In the mental and spiritual sense, this can be what makes you feel "centered", your mental grounding, your thoughts, your belief system, even your sense of self.) For a ku student we define this physically as the position facing forward (as you would be in a stationary/immobile basic stance) with your fist approximately chin level and at center. For a lower body strike we would define snap-back as knee up (belt level), foot up/toes up, ready to proceed any direction, including back to the ground. So in this sense, to the second part of your question on CBA ichi roku "should there be a snap back to home after each strike..."?, yes. Without compromise, you must have a protected home position for your snap-back. But how do YOU define what is familiar and protected for you? What is "home"? Individual comfort and physical build will determine your "home" snap-back position, within reason, maintaining as closely as possible that defined above. But here is where we get to the last part of your question, "or is it ok to snap into the next strike?" in CBA ichi roku and my no/yes answer: Are you losing the focal point or keeping the focus point of each strike? Are you giving away power in each strike or are you delivering it appropriately? Are you dropping the snap out or are you remaining protected in transition? My answer is "no", if you are "slopping" things up and losing focus, power, or protection. But my answer becomes "yes", it's okay to snap "into" the next strike if you are KEEPING focal point, DELIVERING power appropriately, and REMAINING protected in transition, i.e. NOT dropping the snap-back altogether. Be cautious here not to compromise needed protection for the sake of speed and what seems on the surface to be fluidity. Remember, and this might be a key thought, that we are NOT immobile! Neither we nor the opponent are static nor unmoving. Movement and motion is taking place. (Remember the word "action"?) Here is also where we review some skills and learn some new insights. Go back and study CBA ni shi for a moment. Do you see a similar theme of "what happened to my snap back?" What did you learn there? Changes in torso/hip angle during the chuto strike delivery helped us to accomplish the snap-back (strike completion!) there, and smoothed the transition to the next (go) strike. Time to put your learned skills into action! Man, there's that "action" again! Think to forms. We see a few places in our forms too where, if we are not tuned in to the definition of snap-back, we could "lose" awareness of where / what the snap is. You are opening and seeing a new (advanced study) world of more than one type of snap back. This area of study was introduced to many Sanchinkas by CGM Dearman at CGM's Dojo a few years ago. A great opportunity to pick up new ideas! One example might be a "body" snap, where you would snap to the opponent, rather than toward your self to achieve the same protected "home" position and completion of the strike. So we are not eliminating the snap backs, but rather putting them in "transitionally," with our changes in body position, placement. In my understanding, aside from these "transition" snap-backs we see in CBAs ni shi and ichi roku and a few places in forms, always look back "home" for your definition of snap-back. Anything else "crazy", get rid of! Otherwise wild or crazy snap-backs are either (a) not introduced until kata (and should remain there, not be applied elsewhere) or (b) are inconsistent in the study of Sanchin-Ryu. "Make it yours, don't make it up!" Look at the familiar with fresh eyes. Snap to it and have fun! And one last thought. "Home" is not just where we come back to. Home is also where we start from, beginnings. The beginning of "next" anything. The beginning of the first step out the door. It may ground us, but it also is our launching pad, our place to begin again. It can be where you hang your hat today or tomorrow. It transitions with us. But it is always where we are in our hearts. Master Gonerka Discuss below! Share your thoughts and questions with fellow students and maybe your question will be answered the next episode of The Sanchin-Ryu Recap!

Welcome Guest, to The Sachin-Ryu Dojo. Please Login to access Videos, Articles and take part in the Discussion Login Learn More About The Sanchin-Ryu Karate Dojo or Sign-up Today!

Blog